Understanding the Teenage Years

No parent is ever absolutely ready for the changes and challenges they have to encounter and experience when it comes to a teenager. Even though there have been numerous studies trying to explain the reason behind the unpredictable nature of their behavior, there are still some surprising moments faced by every parent during this time. However, understanding why the behavior is such can help you, as a parent; feel more supportive towards them during this phase.

It Ain’t Done Yet

According to neuroscientist Frances Jensen, the teenage brain is still undergoing change and is getting developed which is why their actions do not always seem rational to adults. In this article, we will share some of the realities associated with the teenage years in the hope to educate parents.

The frontal lobes of our brains are considered to be responsible for the decisions that we make and the reactions that we have to things around us. During teenage years, this part of the brain is still in the process of getting re-wired, which is why you should expect yourself to witness a lot of unpredictable responses and bad judgment calls.

Keep It Up

However, this does not mean that you give up on your child; rather it is essential that you play your part as a parent since the habits developed during this time might stay for a long time. Teenagers that develop bad habits such as smoking, drug use and alcohol addiction will face more problems as adults when they try to quit. Thus, it is extremely important that as a parent, you keep doing the best you can to improve your teen’s habits.

Let’s Get Physical

Apart from the biological changes, there are also many physical changes that are taking place during this time of life. Hormonal changes leading to puberty can also be held responsible for the erratic feelings that your adolescent shows – for example, a change in voice, in demeanor, acne, etc. are all changes that make adolescents more vulnerable to having problems related to self-confidence and self-esteem. Your child is at a stage where they are trying to discover and understand their inner-self and at the same time is learning to accept the physical changes that have taken place. It almost feels like they are in someone else’s body. Knowing this, parents are more likely to give the teenage children some benefit of the doubt.

Sleep It Off

Also, the circadian rhythm of the teenager is subject to change as well. Teens, because of this change, feel more alert during the night and need 3-4 more hours of sleep in the morning as compared to adults. Unfortunately, academic needs do not allow them to get the proper sleep, which is what they need during this stage for to be calm and relaxed.

Bottom Line

Even though this time of your child’s life is going to be challenging for both of you, it is recommended that you still play your role to avoid any damaging lifelong effects. As a parent, you need to make sure that you stay connected to your child by being a constant source of support in their life.

To read more about family dynamics, kids, teenagers and parenting, check out GetThrive.com

 

How to Completely Change Your Eating Habits in 2018

If you were completely honest, could you identify which of your eating habits do not service your best health? And, once you pinpointed those habits, would you be willing trade them in for something better? If so, read on to learn how you can completely change your eating habits in 2018.

Let’s Dish on Not-So-Great Eating Habits

 

With the New Year often comes a list of behaviors we’d like to change or improve. One of those items on your list might be the way that you eat. Before we can fix it, we need to recognize it. If you’re having difficulty zoning in on your specific not-so-great eating habits, perhaps the following list can help.

Do you…

  • Skip meals and then overeat?
  • Eat late at night?
  • Eat junk food because it seems convenient?
  • Eat when you’re not hungry?
  • Eat on the run or standing up?
  • Eat when you’re stressed or depressed (emotional eating)

If you indulge in any of the above practices, you’re not providing your body with the best health opportunities possible.

 

How to Make Changes in 2018

 

Eating habits can be a tough nut to crack when wanting to make changes. The desire can exist but the motivation and information may be lacking.

As for motivation, keep in mind that when you make healthy eating choices, you can extend the quality of your life. Excess fat (and toxins) from processed foods and chemicals (including sugar) can lead to heart disease, heart attack, stroke, type-2 diabetes and some forms of cancer. Motivation can be to get healthy/stay healthy/live longer.

As for information, below you will find several suggestions on how to make changes in your eating practices.

 

1) Eat breakfast. If you’ve had a good night’s sleep (7 hours or more in a row), then your blood sugar needs rebalancing when you awake. After all, you’ve been fasting. Clinical dietician Dr. Christy T. Tangey reported, “Studies have found that although people who skip breakfast eat slightly fewer calories during the day, they tend to have higher body mass index, or BMI.”

 

Refueling at the beginning of your day:

– makes you more alert and focused

– makes you less apt to snack or binge eat

– boosts your metabolism (and helps you burn more calories throughout the day)

– sets you up for a healthy day of eating and productivity

 

Sitting down to a plate of eggs, bacon, and toast is not ideal. However, scrambling a couple of eggs or eating a hard-boiled egg are good choices. Oatmeal is quick and healthy, as is yogurt with no-added-sugar granola. A fruit and veggie smoothie with a good fat (flax seeds, almond butter, or avocado) is another great option.

 

2) Keep healthy foods nearby. When you start feeling hungry, grab an apple, a carrot, a celery stick, popcorn (no butter), or a handful of nuts. It’s OK to snack; in fact, it’s preferred as opposed to getting too hungry and then overeating at your next meal. Keeping your select foods with you can come in handy when you’re stuck in traffic, preparing a meal, or when you don’t want to eat the cake at the office.

 

3) Control portions. We don’t need a lot of food—we just need the right ones. Your plate should consist of half veggies and the other half a combo of protein, whole grains, and good fat. This can be achieved on a salad-sized plate. Don’t eat directly from a container or a package—you can easily lose track of how much you’re eating.

 

4) Finish eating way before your bedtime. Going to bed on a full tummy is an awful idea. But, even a small bowl of ice cream or a glass of wine can affect your weight, metabolism, and the quality of your sleep (from the sugar content.) Brush your teeth after dinner; this may prevent you from eating again before bed. If you get a craving, soothe it with a slice of fresh fruit or fruit-infused water. Golden milk has also shown to promote better health when drinking it at least an hour before turning in.

 

5) Replace sitting around snacking with something else. Instead of watching TV and munching on corn chips after work, deliberately chose an alternate activity. Join a yoga class or a Bunco game, take a walk, practice an instrument, or get involved with anything that can distract you from bored or binge snacking.

 

6) Sit down and slow down. Eating should be done mindfully. It’s a process that is nourishing your body to keep you healthy and alive. It justifies your attention. Try not to eat standing in the kitchen. Pull up a chair and take a few minutes to relax and enjoy. (Food is a good thing!) Slow down your eating process, too. It takes your brain up to 20 minutes to notice you might be full. You can avoid overeating by taking smaller bites, chewing longer, and drinking water in between. Using silverware also helps; eating with your hands often makes you eat faster.

 

Hopefully, changing your eating habits makes the top of your New Year’s resolution list. With motivation, information, and action, you will rock it! Best of health in 2018 and many future years to come.

 

Sources:

https://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-and-nutrition-pictures/bad-eating-habits-and-how-to-break-them.aspx#10

https://healthyforgood.heart.org/add-color/articles/healthy-snacking

https://www.pennmedicine.org/news/news-releases/2017/june/timing-meals-later-at-night-can-cause-weight-gain-and-impair-fat-metabolism

https://www.rush.edu/health-wellness/discover-health/why-you-should-eat-breakfast

https://getthrive.com/sugar-hiding-get/