Pregnancy Nausea Good for Mom and Baby

Morning sickness can be physically undesirable; however, new research points to less incidence of miscarriage in women who experience nausea during pregnancy.

The Mother of All Early Pregnancy Studies

Research in the past has been limited linking morning sickness with reduced risk of miscarriage. Early pregnancy, nausea, and vomiting often go hand-in-hand. Approximately eight out of ten women experience the queasy symptoms during the first trimester. That’s when the hormonal surge is most significant.

The newest study is showing that women who suffered morning sickness had up-to-a -75 percent decreased risk of miscarrying. That’s not to say, however, that women who don’t experience nausea are at greater risk of losing the pregnancy.

Pregnancy Test

The study was conducted by the National Institutes of Health in Maryland and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Over 750 expectant moms, averaging 29 years old, were asked to write details in journals. (The other existing participant-criteria was that they each had previously suffered one or two miscarriages.) During the study and their recent pregnancy, they recorded their symptoms and completed questionnaires.

The researchers analyzed the cumulative data. Interestingly enough, one out of five women reported feeling nauseous even before taking a pregnancy test. By week two of gestation, almost 20% complained of nausea; by the eighth week, almost 60% reported morning sickness. Part of the conclusion is that the sickness confirmed continuing pregnancy. Another is that it represented a lower risk of miscarriage.

Other Theories

Aside from this study, some medical experts have speculated alternate reasons for the existence of nausea and vomiting during early pregnancy. One reason is that aversion to certain foods (from the nausea) protects the fetus from potential toxicity. Another is that less food equals lower levels of insulin, in turn, encouraging placenta growth.

Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby

On average, according to UK’s National Health Service, one in six pregnancies end in miscarriage. So, this study may offer some solace to pregnant women with morning sickness. But keep in mind, vomiting can cause dehydration and malnourishment. Mamas-to-be need to stay hydrated and try to keep down nutritious foods, even if it’s in small portions.

Prenatal vitamins are an important supplement to a pregnant mom’s diet. Foods high in iron are suggested, complimented by fresh fruits, which will help keep digestion smoothly. Bananas are great because they’re potassium-rich, help fight-off nausea, and offer some energy to combat natural fatigue. Dairy is important for calcium intake.

Pregnant or not, try to reduce or avoid processed or undercooked meats, fish, and eggs. Keep caffeine intake to a minimal. If you already engage in healthy eating practices and daily exercise, then you are off to a great, healthy pregnancy. If there’s room for improvement, becoming pregnant is a formidable way to change your lifestyle for the best!

Check out www.GetThrive.com for more news on women’s health!

CanaGel Melts

 

Is Childhood Obesity Your Mom’s Fault?

According to a recent study, moms who are overweight tend to feed their children more often—and fill up their plates more. This behavior increases the risk for childhood- and future adult obesity.

Please, May I Have Some More?

Today’s world seems to have such a disparity between childhood starvation and childhood obesity. Neither is healthy—or fair to the child. The particular study that observed the behaviors of overweight and obese mothers was out of the University of Florida.

Of the 29 obese women in the study, researchers concluded that they all assumed their children were hungrier than they were. They fed their children more food than did the mothers of a healthier body weight. The 29 children were all between the ages of three and six years.

Results of Too Much

The lead investigator on the case commented on one of the (negative) aspects of the findings. “Young children have difficulty recognizing when they’re full. The more they’re fed, the more likely they are to eat.” Whether they are full or not.

Certainly, parents and caretakers need to oversee that children are fed when hungry. The difference, however, is that the obese women presupposed that the kids required more food than they did. This study opens up a great dialogue on how parents and children together can work on reasonable portions.

The Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics recently published these discoveries. Appropriate portions during childhood can lead to a lifelong of healthy eating habits. Additionally, learning at a young age what it’s like to feel hungry—and then full—is essential for each.

Snacking Situation

Snacks can be good. In fact, they can increase metabolism, help lower blood sugar, and relieve hunger before the next meal. But, they have to be nutritious!

Salty snacks (high in sodium and low in fiber or vitamins) and candy are the major calories derived from the worst snacking. Research in the past decade has shown that children’s snacks consist of almost one-third of their daily caloric intake. Since the 1990’s, kids’ calories from snacks have gone up almost 170 calories, daily.

Snacks for children and adults should be fiber and nutrition-rich. Some examples are carrots, a handful of nuts, or a scoop of peanut or almond butter on a celery stick. Fruit is good in moderation and should be derived fresh (not from juice or cans.) A scoop of anything with healthy fats (avocado, hummus) on an organic corn chip is perfectly acceptable and delicious. And, don’t forget to drink a glass of water!

Knowledge is Power

Knowing how much to feed yourself—and your child—is essential to maintaining a healthy body weight. Remember that your stomach is much larger than a toddler’s. It’s also important to recognize true hunger. Are you really hungry? Or bored? Or stressed?

And just because it tastes good, are you eating more than you need?

You can help prevent your child from becoming overweight by teaching healthy eating habits early in life. Part of how this can be accomplished is through modeling. Check with your practitioner, pediatrician, or nutritionist for professional guidance. You can always check here for other tips on nutrition, parenting, and best health practices.

 

Bad Moms, Average Moms, Best Moms?

In the best of all worlds, mothers should be honored on a daily basis, not just one day a year. And within that honor, should include an understanding of a basic human reality—no one is perfect. With that, lives the contradiction that no mom is perfect, yet each mom is perfect. The mom we get and the moms we become are perfect for our individual lives. How we were raised and how we are raising children, shapes who we are and all that we can become.

In today’s media-driven society, everyone clamors to post their best photo or most impressive description of their mom. One husband may post that he is grateful for his wife who cleans, gourmet-feeds, brand-name dresses, gently disciplines, and mini-van chauffeurs the kids. How wonderful for him and their children. But is mom getting enough rest or any of her other needs met? Hopefully so. And for that family, that may work out wonderfully.

Yet, what about the mom who gets up and has to hop in the shower so she herself can be clean for work? She doesn’t have time to make pancakes, eggs, and bacon for the kids. But she yells to them from the bathroom, as she dries her hair, to grab a banana, a granola bar, and put a frozen waffle in the toaster. She reminds them to be polite to others on the bus and not to talk to strangers. Is she a less superior mom?

There’s a comedy film soon to be released titled, Bad Moms. Whether the movie turns out to be funny is irrelevant right now—the point is that every woman who’s seen the trailer or heard of the title laughs aloud and is intrigued by the concept.

We’re compelled by this notion because being a “bad mom” swirls in our heads daily. It’s either something we identify with, something we experienced, or something we are deathly afraid of becoming. Whichever of these fit our description, we still deserve to be celebrated on Mother’s Day—without judgment.

Moms need to be celebrated for bringing us into the world. By their divine grace and through our own years of experience, we learn tolerance and forgiveness.

Your mom was perfect for you. She may have brilliantly nurtured you or, in other ways, caused emotional damage; either scenario, it has supplied an experience into your life that has helped inform who you have become.

As we age, we realize we must take responsibility for our choices and behavior, just as that is the same information we must impart to our children, regardless of the wonderful things we’ve done for them—or the mistakes we’ve made.

Hope your Mother’s day was perfect for the perfectly imperfect mother you are and for the mother that you have (or had.) All we can do is our best, and that is worth celebrating.

 

 

Are Children’s Birthday Parties Out of Control?

For many busy parents children’s birthdays look nothing like they did even a decade ago. As a child, your birthday probably happened at home, surrounded by family and maybe a few friends. You opened a couple presents, blew out the candles, and dug into a cake – homemade by Mom, of course.

Today’s birthdays bear little resemblance to the simple parties of times gone by. Modern children’s parties are action-packed affairs that require weeks (and even months) of planning.

Parents take on a laundry lists of tasks that include everything from shopping, baking, entertaining, preparing, planning, and – ultimately – exhaustion. Parties feature Pinterest-inspired favors and handmade decorations that would put a wedding reception to shame.

Fight for Your Right to Party!

To have a proper party today, you need a theme, color scheme, and personalized décor that complements your child’s age and interests. One family spent $40,000 on a Wizard of Oz-themed birthday party. Another featured 32 floral centerpieces and 300 costumes.

Check out this article on children’s birthday parties published by the Huffington Post.

The situation has become so dire, one family therapist was inspired to gather a few moms and launch a website to raise awareness about excessive children’s birthday parties.

The problem isn’t confined to the United States, either. One study found that parents in Britain spend almost $2 billion on children’s parties each year.

Read more about these studies here.
Fortunately, there are ways to strike a balance between over-the-top and too little fuss.

1. Scale Back on Gifts – A Mom’s Mantra

Everyone says they’re going to do it, but few people stick to their resolve. The truth is, the party is supposed to be for the child, but many end up being forMom and Dad. When a party becomes a status symbol, it’s time to cut back.

If the presents at your house have turned into small mountains, make a conscious effort to scale down. One popular modern mom mantra suggests buying a child just four gifts: something they want, something they need, something to wear, and something to read.

By reducing presents to just four thoughtful items, you and your child can pause to truly savor the act of opening gifts.

2. Lower Expectations (Must Be This Tall to Ride…)

Many people experience a small bout of depression after the holiday season concludes. As children’s parties become bigger, more extravagant affairs, experts say the same phenomenon is emerging around birthday parties.

Experts speculate that the buildup and subsequent let-down surrounding just one day causes kids to experience a roller coaster of emotions. Consider slowly scaling back birthday celebrations so your child is not overwhelmed.

3. It’s Better to Give Than to Receive…

Turn your child’s birthday into an opportunity to teach him or her about helping others. Instead of accepting gifts from classmates or friends, ask invitees to bring an item of clothing or a book to donate to someone in need.

Other ideas include gathering toiletry items or clothing for domestic violence shelters, or assembling food and other supplies for your local humane society. Most community outreach organizations are always looking for food, clothing, and other items.

Other good ideas include visiting a nursing home to visit with residents and serving in a soup kitchen.

4. Pick One Big Gift (with Your Child’s Help)

As birthdays approach, many parents wander the toy aisles, trying to find gifts their child will love. Instead of wracking your brain for gift ideas, consider allowing your child to select one major gift with your help.

You may wish to shop online so your child can have fun browsing the Internet for ideas. Besides eliminating stress, online shopping can also save money. Many retailers offer exclusive Internet coupons and deals during various times of the year.

A child’s birthday should be a special day, but it doesn’t have to be overwhelming. By managing your child’s expectations and making a few adjustments, you can slow it all down and enjoy a more peaceful celebration with your birthday boy or girl.

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Is Being an Older Mom a Good Thing?

Society, for centuries, has dictated that young couple meets, gets married, and directly starts a family. Times have changed, especially in the past couple of decades in the US; women are becoming moms later in life. And it turns out it’s a good thing—for mom and baby!

Hey, Old Lady!

One of the most recently discovered perks associated with having a child later in life is longevity. Women who had their first baby after the age of 25 were over 10% more likely to live until 90 years old.

Twenty-six years old is not considered “later in life” to many Americans, but globally, it may be considered old. The study from the Women’s Health Initiative examined data extracted from over 25,000 women. Another discovery from that research showed that women who had two or more children tended to outlive those who had only one.

A different study published a few years back showed even more promising results for “older” moms. That particular researched claimed that women who had children after the age of 33, were two times as likely to live to be in their late 90’s!

The Sweet Spot

Surely having your first child at the age of 44 is going to come with great risk, even with the incredible medical care we have today. Regardless, a study out of Sweden contends that the benefits outweigh the risks for the outcome of the child in cases where the mom is between 35 and 40.

The Millenium Cohort Study out of the United Kingdom also discovered advantages to older parenting. Women who had their first child between the ages of 30 and 39 had offspring who scored higher on intelligence tests than children of first-time mothers in their 20’s.

Perks for the Baby

Women who are older tend to have settled into their careers or at least have completed some form of higher education. Their children are statistically more likely to go to college.

The children are also more likely to read for pleasure and have a larger vocabulary. It could be because the moms have more time to spend with baby. Mom can devote more of herself toward nurturing early education, playtime, and other activities.

Having had more experience on earth—and socializing—older moms often have stronger support networks. They’ve had time to bond and build solid friendships. Additionally, they’re apt to have like-minded friends who’ve also waited to have their first child. Either that or their support group has already had children and can be of help and guidance.

With age, hopefully, our earning capacity increases. Statistics claim that older moms tend to have more expendable income. This works out well for mama and child. Mom can provide feasibly for baby as well as indulge in extracurricular activities.

Of course there are exceptions, but generally, mature women make healthier life choices—especially when they’re pregnant. The best outcome is a fit mom and a child whose outlook in life is positive and healthy. Surely, great moms appear at any age. But if you’re older and are concerned that that’s a detriment, you can ease your concerns… It’s all good!